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Venues in Sussex County, Delaware (167)

venues in Sussex County | Sussex County locations for weddings

Sussex County is a county located in the southern part of the US state of Delaware. As of 2010 the population was 197,145, an increase of 25.9% over the previous decade. The county seat is Georgetown. The Seaford Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is the largest micropolitan area in the United States, includes all of Sussex County.

Sussex County is Delaware's largest county by land area, with 938 square miles (2,429 km). The first European settlement in the state of Delaware was founded in 1631 near the present-day town of Lewes. However, Sussex County was not organized until 1683.

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Georgetown
Georgetown

Bethany Beach Bethel Bridgeville Dagsboro Delmar Ellendale Fenwick Island Frankford Greenwood Harbeson Laurel Lewes Lincoln Millsboro Millville Milton Nassau Ocean View Rehoboth Beach Seaford Selbyville
Laurel School District
Children's Events

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DJ BUMP
(302) 537-3278
793 Garfield Pky
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Patsy's Restaurant
(302) 537-2433
121 Campbell Pl
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Cornerstone Community Church
(302) 846-0701
605 N Bi State Blvd
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Boston Beanery Restaurant & Tavern
(617) 232-8989
79 West Virginia Ave
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Dogwood Cafe
(843) 545-7777
499 N Front St
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Eastern Shore Community Church
(302) 856-9787
18793 Dupont Blvd
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Secluded Oasis
(302) 934-6750
18674 Asketum Branch Rd
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Master's Manor Inn
(302) 236-5973
22934 Zoar Rd
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Cafe Tamburelli's
(302) 349-9700
3 E Market St
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House Sports Bar
(302) 875-9476
10912 County Seat Hwy
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La Rosa Negra Family Cucina
(302) 645-1980
1201 Savannah Rd
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Sleep Inn & Suites
(302) 645-6464
18451 Coastal Hwy
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An Inn by the Bay
(302) 644-8878
205 Savannah Rd
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Shawnee Country Club Inc
(302) 422-9745
6152 S Rehoboth Blvd
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Georgia House Restaurant
(302) 934-6737
119 Main St
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Oak Orchard Diner & Family Restaurant
(302) 945-5880
31507 Oak Orchard Rd
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The JOURNEY a wesleyan church
(302) 934-6632
255 Wilson Hwy
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Baywood Greens
 
32201 Clubhouse Way
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Donut Connection
(302) 684-2900
26850 Lewes Georgetown Hwy
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The Milton House
(507) 330-3559
200 Broadkill Rd
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Scents by Kim
(302) 539-9510
81 Central Ave
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The Fat Tuna Grill
(302) 541-8200
199 Atlantic Ave

History of Sussex County


Archaeologists estimate that the first inhabitants of Sussex County, the southernmost county in Delaware, arrived between 10,000 and 14,000 years ago. Native Americans in Sussex County called themselves by the various tribal names of the Algonquin Nation. The most prominent tribes in the area were the Leni Lenape and Nanticoke tribes. The people settled along the numerous bodies of water in the area where they were able to harvest fish, oysters, and other shellfish in the fall and winter. In the warmer months they planted crops, and hunted deer and other small mammals as larger game was not present in the area.

There is no universally agreed upon group known to be the first to settle in Sussex County. In the early years of exploration, from 1593 to 1630, many feel the Spanish or Portuguese were probably the first Europeans to see the Delaware River and the lands of present day Sussex County.

Henry Hudson, on his expedition for the Dutch West India Company, discovered the Delaware River in 1609. Attempting to following him, Samuel Argall, an English explorer, was blown off course in 1610 and landed in a strange bay that he named after the Governor of Virginia, Thomas West, Lord De La Warr.

In the first half of 1613, Cornelius Jacobsen Mey, a Dutch navigator, discovered and named both Cape May, New Jersey and Cape Henlopen, (originally Hindlopen) in the Delaware Bay. Later it was found that what May had named Henlopen, was actually Fenwick Island protruding into the Atlantic Ocean, and the name of the cape was moved to its present location just east of Lewes.

Sussex County was the site of the first European settlement in Delaware, a trading post named Zwaanendael at the present site of Lewes. On June 3, 1631, Dutch captain David Pietersen de Vries landed along the shores of the Delaware to establish a whaling colony in the mid-Atlantic of the New World. The colony only lasted until 1632, when De Vries left. Upon returning to Zwaanendael that December, he found the Indian tribes had killed his men and burned the colony. The Dutch then set about settling the area once again.

The original boundaries were undefined with boundary disputes between the family of William Penn, who claimed the county extended to Fenwick Island, and Charles Calvert, 5th Baron Baltimore, who claimed the county ended at Lewes with all the land south of that belonging to Somerset County. Maryland and Pennsylvania both claimed the land between the 39th and 40th parallels according to the charters granted to each colony. The 'Three Lower Counties' (Delaware) along Delaware Bay moved into the Penn sphere of settlement, and later became the Delaware Colony, a satellite of Pennsylvania.

In 1732 the proprietary governor of Maryland, Charles Calvert, signed an agreement with William Penn's sons which drew a line somewhere in between, and also renounced the Calvert claim to Delaware. But later Lord Baltimore claimed that the document he signed did not contain the terms he had agreed to, and refused to put the agreement into effect. Beginning in the mid-1730s, violence erupted between settlers claiming various loyalties to Maryland and Pennsylvania. The border conflict between Pennsylvania and Maryland would be known as Cresap's War.

The issue was unresolved until the Crown intervened in 1760, ordering Frederick Calvert, 6th Baron Baltimore to accept the 1732 agreement. As part of the settlement, the Penns and Calverts commissioned the English team of Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon to survey the newly established boundaries between the Province of Pennsylvania, the Province of Maryland, Delaware Colony and parts of Colony and Old Dominion of Virginia.

Between 1763 and 1767, Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon surveyed the Mason-Dixon line settling Sussex County's western and southern borders. After Pennsylvania abolished slavery in 1781, the western part of this line and the Ohio River became a border between free and slave states, although Delaware remained a slave state.

In 1769 there was a movement started to move the county seat from Lewes to the area then known as Cross Roads, the present day site of Milton. The current county seat of Georgetown was settled upon on January 27, 1791 after residents in western Sussex County successfully petitioned the Delaware General Assembly to move the county seat to a central location as roads at the time made it too difficult to reach the county seat in Lewes. Georgetown was not a previously established town and on May 9, 1791, the 10 commissioners headed by President of the State Senate George Mitchell negotiated the purchase of 76 acres (310,000 m) and Commissioner Rhodes Shankland began the survey by laying out "a spacious square of 100 yards (91 m) each way." Eventually the Town was laid out in a circle one mile (1.6 km) across, centered on the original square surveyed by Shankland and now listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Georgetown was named after Senate President George Mitchell.

Sussex County has been known by several names over the years including Susan County, Hoorenkill or Whorekill County as named by the Dutch prior to 1680 when Kent County broke off, Deale County from 1680 to 1682 after being taken over by the British under James Stuart, Duke of York prior to signing over to William Penn, and Durham County when claimed by the Lords Baltimore during the boundary dispute with the Penn family.

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How to have a great event in Sussex County


Ready to have a wedding, birthday or special event in Sussex County? We have more Sussex County wedding sites available to browse, compare and explore than anywhere on the internet. We currently have over 750,000 venues on our website, 167 of which reside in Sussex County.

Selecting the perfect Sussex County locations for weddings or venues in Sussex County is critical to the success of every wedding, party, special event, or corporate event. The journey of finding a wedding site or event venue can be a difficult and time consuming task requiring a significant amount of time an effort. VenueHelper.com provides on online Sussex County locations for weddings / event venue directory to make finding Sussex County locations for weddings or event venue easier. Here is our checklist of things to consider when selecting the perfect event venues in Sussex County.

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